Amazing Nature Pics You Won't Believe...

Discussion in 'Photos' started by Airbornemama, Dec 2, 2018.

  1. Airbornemama

    Airbornemama Mama Loves You All Out There!...DA Admin. Staff Member

    8,237
    26,176
    Nov 27, 2016
    Female
    Here, there and everywhere!
    Lightning Formation...
    This photo was taken with long exposure at the moment lightning hit the tree. Electricity shoots down the tree trunk and spreads to the ground, illuminating the trunk in a beautiful violet color. As pretty as it is, if you ever get stuck in a thunderstorm, it’s best not to stay outdoors!...
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    Tanzanian Tigers...
    This photo was captured before the magnificent thylacine went extinct. Also called a Tasmanian tiger, this species wasn’t actually a tiger, nor was it a canine. In fact, this was considered the largest carnivorous marsupial on earth until the International Union for Conversation of Nature declared it extinct in 1982. The Tasmanian government did the same four years later. However, many reports come in of sightings in the wild, raising the likelihood a population of these majestic animals is still living somewhere out there in the wild...
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    Blue Lava...
    One of the most destructive occurrences in our world is the explosion of a volcano. But in Indonesia, the Kawah Ijen crater on the island of Java appears to spout blue lava instead of the traditional yellow and orange tones we are all used to.
    The most interesting part is the confusion this produces. The lava is not inherently blue. Instead, this event is produced by the combustion of a high concentration of sulfur in the area of the volcano. When sulfur ignites, it burns with a blue flame. So when the high concentration of sulfur comes in contact with the lava, the lava appears to turn blue.
    In reality, it’s only the blue flames from the sulfur flowing down the mountain. That’s why this effect only appears at night...
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    A White Rainbow...
    Rainbows are one of the most common and beautiful things you can see. Water works as a prism to break the light into the visible spectrum of colors. But every so often, there is a special type of effect that happens when conditions are ideal.
    A colorless rainbow occurs in the same fashion as other rainbows, with sunlight passing through water droplets. But in this case, it happens when fog is forming. The droplets in the fog are much smaller. As a result, most color is lost while passing through them...
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    Rainbow Trees...
    Do you like rainbows? How about trees? Ever wondered what the combination of the two would look like?
    Well, here we have Eucalyptus deglupta, commonly known as the rainbow eucalyptus. Native to the Philippines and other tropical areas, it can grow up to 76 meters (250 ft).
    Most of the year, the tree has a smooth orange bark. But in summer, the tree loses this husk to reveal a multicolored bark which gives it the name of “rainbow.” Streaks of green, red, orange, gray, and even purple cover the bark...
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    Living Rocks...
    Rocks can be found everywhere. If you look inside your shoes after walking on a trail, chances are you are carrying some with you. They are dry, rough, and hard. But sometimes, you can find one that bleeds.
    Introducing Pyura chilensis, also known in Spanish as piure, this “rock” is actually a saclike marine invertebrate filter feeder (aka sea squirt). These filter feeders have a characteristically bloodred hue to their insides which gave them their nickname of “bleeding rocks.” Locally, they are eaten raw like an oyster or cooked with salad and rice...
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    Ice Flowers...
    Similar to hair ice, these formations are beautiful to observe and equally rare. The main difference is how and where they form. Frost flowers mainly form over water or humid surfaces.
    When the cold humid air above a water surface becomes saturated, frost starts to form on any imperfections on the water surface. These imperfections are the rooting for these “flowers,” and the moisture from the air helps them rise...
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    Hair Ice...
    If you live in a place where snow falls, then you are probably familiar with any kind of ice you can imagine. But we guarantee that you have never seen this type of ice.
    It is commonly known as hair ice. It grows only on humid winter nights and usually melts in the day. Ice crystals form on rotten wood that has a presence of mycelium, which are the roots of a fungusthat lives on rotting wood.
    The fungus makes the ice crystals grow in a hairlike fashion. It is incredibly hard to spot because any snow around this beautiful type of ice will camouflage it. So next time you are taking a stroll through winter woods, keep your eyes peeled and check the forest floor. You might find this beautiful treat...
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    The Neverending Wave...
    The dream of any surfer is a wave that continues on and on without breaking. That actually happens in Brazil and is known as the Pororoca. The wave can travel 800 kilometers (500 mi) without slowing down, be around 3.7 meters (12 ft) high, and last for over half an hour.
    This happens because the Atlantic Oceantides meet the mouth of the Amazon River. The sound it produces can be heard 30 minutes in advance of its arrival. Since the wave contains debris from the river, which can be entire trees, it’s also the most dangerous wave to ride...
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  2. Abu Mujahid

    Abu Mujahid Drawing Blood

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    435
    May 25, 2018
    Male
    England, leicester
    the hair ice is beautiful definitely my favorite
     
    Airbornemama and mcgiggles like this.
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